Customer service is important to an organization because it is often the only contact a customer has with a company. Customers are vital to an organization. Some customers spend hundreds and even thousands of dollars per year with a company. Consequently, when they have a question or product issue, they expect a company’s customer service department to resolve their issues.

Customer service is also important to an organization because it can help differentiate a company from its competitors. Therefore, putting extra efforts into customer service may be things that give one drug store a competitive advantage.
A company with excellent customer service is more likely to get repeat business from customers. Consequently, the company will benefit with greater sales and profits. Contrarily, companies with poor customer service may lose customers, which will have a negative impact on business. It costs a lot more money for a company to acquire a customer than to retain them, due to advertising costs and the expense of sales calls. Therefore, the efforts that go into maintaining quality customer service can really pay dividends over time.

People that have a positive experience with a company’s customer service department will likely tell two or three others about their experience. Therefore, quality customer service can be a source of promotion for organizations. Contrarily, a person who has a bad customer service experience will likely tell between nine and 20 people.
It’s a good idea to provide customer service training to new and existing staff training. Here are some simple things your staff can do to encourage customer satisfaction. Here are some tips for developing good customer relationships:

  • Greet your customers as they walk through the door. You can ask them how they are, or how you can help them.
  • If your customers have to wait to be served (e.g. waiting for a table at a café, waiting to be seen in a doctors’ office) it can be helpful to have someone, like a receptionist, greeting your customers and letting them know how long the wait is expected to be.
  • Checking in on your customers while they’re in your shop can also be helpful. Examples include asking them if they enjoyed their meal, or if they’d like you to help them find a different product. This can also give them a chance to ask any questions they might have.

Knowing your product inside out is invaluable, particularly in a face-to-face business setting. Being able to immediately answer any tricky questions from your customers can help build trust and credibility.